February 2017 Exhibitions

SohoPhoto Gallery
15 White Street
New York, NY 10013

Gallery hours:
Wednesday to Sunday
1:00pm - 6:00pm
(and by appointment)

212.226.8571
Contact SohoPhoto

Whisper Loudly

 

—Patricia Beary

Photograph © Patricia Beary

February at Soho Photo Gallery

The gallery is proud to present solo shows by seven gallery artists.

EXHIBITION DATES: February 8 – March 4, 2017
OPENING RECEPTION: Tuesday, February 7, 2017, from 6pm to 8pm

 

Whisper Loudly

Patricia Beary

 

“Symbolizing death, cemeteries are both feared and revered. In this solemn setting I often feel like an intruder with my camera, but there are stories to be told. I listened with my eyes and in the whispers found renewal amidst decay. Each image solicits inquiry. Questions will outnumber answers as you interpret incongruous relics. Listen to the whispers and create your own eulogy. In this setting honoring the dead, life is revealed.”

IPatricia Beary_Resurrection

© Patricia Beary

Enter Knowing

Millie Falcaro

 

“The phrase, Enter Knowing, and the resulting emotional associations reverberate and stimulate unconscious associations as I use the materials in the chemigram process invented in the 1950s by Belgian artist Pierre Cordier. In this method, silver gelatin paper is manipulated by applying resists and by painting and drawing on the surface with traditional darkroom chemicals forming patterns and abstracted shapes yielding an unpredictable range of colors and luster.”

Falcaro_Millie_Chemigram_1

© Millie Falcaro

Shadow

George Greenstein

 

“The story is told that as he lay upon his deathbed Goethe called out for more light. The shutters were thrown wide: blessed sunlight dispelled the sickroom’s shadows. City dwellers that we are, with light available at the touch of a switch, we tend to forget the terrible power of darkness. I want to show what might happen when we enter the realm of Shadow.”

Greenstein_1_1

© George Greenstein

No Difference Between Them

Robert Kalman

 

“Robert Kalman’s extraordinary portraits of interracial couples in No Difference Between Them show us what love looks like. It’s not contrast but connection that he has captured. Kalman meets the shared gaze of each couple with warmth. And whether they hold onto each other or not, the couples look like they belong together. Kalman’s photographs witness their bond. No Difference Between Them is an essential record of what human connection looks like. And Kalman has done it with great skill and clearly great love.” — Heidi W. Durrow

RobertKalman_Sondra & Tom_hi_rez_

© Robert Kalman

Color Interactions

Tony Kirman

 

“How do we react emotionally to different colors, their complementary and antagonistic meanings? This series begins with Josef Albers’ painterly exploration of color’s weight, volume and humidity, translating it into the digital realm of hue, saturation and brightness. I use photo-gestures to create abstract images and then sample and manipulate specific colors to explore their interactions..”

Untitled (Sexuality)

© Tony Kirman

Abandoned: Inside and Out

Joan Lemler

 

“I am intrigued by the ghostly quiet of deserted interiors and forbidden spaces. I like to photograph the peeling walls, revealing layers of color; structures in such disrepair that only light inhabits them, or abandoned buildings whose intricate design had to come from an earlier era. Most of all, I love to photograph the windows. No longer transparent, they are shaded, patched and broken with a patina that diffuses the light that pours through them.”

LEMLER_Joan_Exit

© Joan Lemler

Visibly Invisible

Allison Rufrano

 

Allison Rufrano is an accomplished artist whose thought provoking work has been exhibited in solo and group exhibitions internationally including in New York, Italy, Russia, China, Korea, and Japan. Her evocative use of light and subject enables Rufrano to tap into the viewers’ perception, creating a personal dialogue between her work and the observer. Visibly Invisible deals with identity, where Rufrano utilizes herself to express internal struggle and uncertainty.

Rufrano_Visibly Invisible_2016

© Allison Rufrano